Airports – Ready for the Cloud ?

Unlike airlines which are used to distributed operations and having systems like a reservation system hosted centrally at their hub (originating in the times of mainframe servers with access to this crucial part of their operations only via a remote connection), airports still tend to follow a much more traditional approach. Airport operations are local and and not geographically distributed like airlines, over decades they established local data-centres on-premise and created a mindset of full control only available with the server and IT services right in their basement. Along come big IT departments with teams of server-, network-, db-admins and support.

St. Albert at Dublin Airport, circa 1950 (CC by National LIbrary of Irland)

St. Albert at Dublin Airport, circa 1950 (CC by National Library of Ireland)

This paradigm is slowly changing, due to the fact airports need to cut cost and operate more efficiently. In parallel we can observe an attitude change at management levels, becoming more open to solutions which are outside of their physical control, they buy in the concept of SAAS, consuming a service on a subscription base with a well defined SLA and availability. This shift started with less crucial back-office systems, like Email-Server and document repositories, and now moving on towards more operation critical systems. Slow adopters or companies restricted by policies or governance issues start moving towards a private cloud, eventually cutting down on operations costs. Airports start to understand internet availability in the year 2015 reached a commodity level like water and electricity, they start to adopt even public cloud hosted services.
Zero tolerance systems like ATC or something less life critical like a FIDS system will remain certainly a local solution, but AODB’s are moving into the cloud. All the vendors jumped on the bandwagon and offer some kind of cloud solution, be in a private cloud offering (with the vendor) or even deployed to a public cloud. The potential in this approach is the opportunity to offer an AODB solution at a fraction of a price of traditional AODB projects. Deploying to a public cloud, without any local requirements other than an internet connection and a browser, a small airport can start using an AODB without any investment, maybe at a price as cheap as 3.000,- Euro monthly subscription. Assuming a smaller airport (less than 1 million PAX/year or something like 25..50 commercial flights a day plus GA) is operating with simple requirements (flight plan import and management, operational flight tracking,  billing, Type B and AFTN message interface).

To answer the questions: Yes, they are ready.
But it depends on the IT strategy of medium to big airports or the restricted budget and need of smaller airports.

Let’s see who is serving the long tail in the airport market !

Advertisements

One thought on “Airports – Ready for the Cloud ?

  1. Pingback: Airport AODB goes NoSQL (Part 1) | The JavaDude Weblog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s