IATA Type B Bag Messages and Baggage Messaging Refresher

There is quite some movement in baggage handling and its associated messaging needs and requirements at the moment.  Though the IATA recommended practices RP 1745 and RP 1800 are around for quite a while, the IATA Resolution 753 (baggage tracking and custody) has to be implemented by June 2018 and the new BAG XML message standard is shaping up and will most likely released first time in 2017. Traditionally any handling of baggage requires a type-B message to be sent to the relevant parties. This is a push-based approach and due to the nature of type-B messages prone to errors (format) and accumulate costs by the distributing network operators and its transaction based charges. According to a IATA study/business case in the year 2012 26 million of bags have been mishandled, mostly for transfer bag handling and a good share of this is caused by missing or wrong messages.

This article is meant to provide an overview or general introduction, aka baggage messaging for starters. Baggage Handling is very complex process with dependencies and actors, including airlines, airport, handling agent and eventually the passenger and his baggage.

Main Systems involved in the process of baggage handling

DCS Departure Control System
BHS Baggage Handling System
BRS Baggage Reconciliation System

DCS
The Departure Control System is the operational backbone of every airline. It supports the check-in, baggage acceptance, boarding process and other related activities like load control, immigration.

BHS
The Baggage Handling System (usually owned by the airport) is a complex system of conveyor belts, chutes and bag drops that transports and buffers any checked-in luggage. It ensures that luggage that is checked-in, transferred or received from arriving flights is tracked, counted, scanned, screened and transported to the right bag chute or belt.

BRS
The Baggage Reconciliation System, usually used by the handling agent, helps to match passenger, bag, flight and container.

Traditional Type-B Messages for Baggage Handling (defined in IATA RP 1745)
RP 1745 defines the formats of the messages exchanged between the systems for automated baggage and passenger reconciliation, baggage sortation and other baggage services.

BTM Baggage Transfer Message
BSM Baggage Source Message
BPM Baggage Processed Message
BUM Baggage Unload Message
BNS Baggage Not Seen Message
BCM Baggage Control Message
BMM Baggage Manifest Message
BRQ Baggage Request

Baggage Tag Number or License Plate Code
A unique 10 digit number as reference for each piece of baggage, defined in IATA RP 740.
The bag tag number is part of the baggage messages.
According to resolution 751, effective June 1st 2013, the format contains only numbers.
Sample: 0220208212 (0-220-208212)

1 1 digit Leading digit 0
2 3 digit Airline code 220 Lufthansa
3 6 digit Bag number 208212

The printed barcode is a regular ITF-14 code, any smartphone can read the barcode. The number is also printed on the bag tag.

KLM is printing a “KL” in between but the barcode only contains numbers. “074” for KLM.

BTM
The Transfer Message contains bag information for the outbound carrier of incoming transfer passengers. Part of a through check-in transaction.

BSM
The Source Message is sent from the DCS to the baggage handling system upon checkin at the airport or bag drop.

BPM
The Processed Message is an status update sent locally, eg. baggage handling to carrier. BPM’s are often batched.

BUM
The Unload Message is the instruction to unload (or not to load) a specific bag, eg. no-show PAX at the gate.

BNS
The Not Seen Message contains bag info for baggage that could not been transported together with the passenger.

BCM
The Control Message serves secondary level information, such as
BAM Baggage Acknowledgement
FOM Flight Open
FMM Final Match
DBM Delete Baggage

BMM
The Baggage Manifest contains baggage details for down line stations.

BRQ
The Baggage Request asks for bag info from a baggage handling system.

Sample Message
A very simple sample of a transfer message

BTM
.V/1TOFRA
.I/LH123/14OCT/CPH
.F/LH234/14OCT/SIN
.N/0220588615021
.P/SMITH/JOHN   
.L/7FABC
ENDBTM
1 .V Version and suppl. data Transfer Station FRA (Frankfurt)
2 .I Inbound Flight Number and date CPH (Copenhagen)
3 .F Outbound Flight Number and date SIN (Singapore)
4 .N Baggage Details 10 digit bag tag id 0220588615021
5 .P Passenger Name John Smith
6 .L PNR Passenger Name Record 7FABC

Message Flow for interline flight

The below is rather simplistic view (sunshine scenario) of the messaging that happens around bag management for a 2 segment interline flight with through-check-in of bags.

Message Flow for interline flight
A passenger is flying on LH 401 from JFK to FRA and SQ 025 from FRA to SIN. An interline flight with baggage checked through Singapore.

Relevant Documentation or References

IATA RP 1745 Baggage Service Messages
IATA RP 1796
Baggage System Interface
IATA RP 1701f
Self Service Baggage Process
IATA RP 1800
Baggage Process Description for Self-Service Check-in
IATA RES 753
Baggage Tracking

Online References
Remark: Most of the IATA documents are not available freely and have to be purchased, here only links to public documents or pages.

IATA RES 753 https://www.iata.org/whatwedo/stb/Documents/baggage-tracking-res753.pdf
IATA BAG XML Initiative
http://www.iata.org/whatwedo/ops-infra/baggage/Pages/baggage-xml.aspx

Disclaimer: The information provided here might not be correct or complete. It is for educational purpose only. For reliable information please refer to the IATA manuals.

Airport AODB goes NoSQL (Part 1)

In previous blog posts I discussed ‘AODB and Big Data‘ and ‘AODB in the Cloud‘. As promised, in this third and largest part of the review, I will look at the NoSQL database approach, design a document datamodel, embed it into a MEAN stack and conclude in looking forward implementing an AODB in a Serverless Architecture using Microservices.

In this new series I will review the benefits and options of using a document-oriented database (NoSQL) and start a transition journey moving away from a relational database model to document database.

Robert Yarnall Richie, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University

Lockheed 12A Electra Junior, Delta Air Lines at Dallas Airport in 1940 by Robert Yarnall Richie (DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University)

Before jumping into relational datamodel review and document design we shall have look at some industry initiatives and working groups that strive for standards with semantic models, business models,  information and data models and exchange formats and patterns. While a lot of airport systems have been developed years back in the absence of these models, but with best knowledge and common practice and experience in the field, we cannot ignore further the existence of emerging and established standards. For legacy systems is near to impossible to adopt the models at the core business implementation layer as products are usually designed around a datamodel which cannot be changed without a significant or even total redesign of the system. Here the approach is the adoption of the models at an integration and mapping layer. You can adopt eg. AIDX as messaging exchange format without having to use it as base of the product, though it creates additionally effort to create mappings. An additional challenge is certainly the number of models around because they were created by different organisations with different but often overlapping aviation domains in mind. I have to admit the organisations are cooperating and represented in the working groups to achieve a level of harmonization where possible. We look at IATA, ICAO, ACI, Eurocontrol, EUROCAE as lead organizations here.

Lets list the current models. This list is certainly not complete and only provides a brief overview. We can and should benefit from the availability of these models (most of them are freely accessible). A lot of standardization effort is going on at the moment, please note some models are to be considered as “work-in-progress”, some are quite advanced, major changes are not be expected and some are also due to submission to governing boards soon or in the process of it. Once the models, at least the exchange message formats, start materializing as official standard we will see them appearing in requirement and tender documents and soon to be out there to simplify system integration.

AIDX Aviation Information Data Exchange IATA XML Message Standard ***
AIDM Airline Industry Data Model IATA Model **
AIRM ATM Information Reference Model Eurocontrol Model ***
AIXM Aeronautical Information Exchange Model Eurocontrol Model ***
ACRIS Semantic Model ACI Model *
AMXM Aerodrome Mapping Exchange Model EUROCAE Model ***
FIXM Flight Information Exchange Model Model ***
WXXM Weather Information Exchange Model Eurocontrol Model ***
BAG XML
Baggage Message Exchange Eurocontrol XML Message Standard *

Status as of end 2016
*** official release available
* work in progress

In the context of AODB products I will look at the below models and message standards first, though all of them are important because there is no clear borderline in the heterogeneous IT landscape at airports, eg. it is a common request by users to see weather data being displayed in dashboards of an AODB despite weather is not a key entity. In the further blog entries, while establishing a new datamodel, we will also discuss the individual models. Some models focus more on ATM and less on airport related activities.

AIDX

Aviation Information Data Exchange is a XML messaging standard to allow information exchange between airlines, airports and other parties in the aviation community. It has been initially created in 2005 and was officially released in 2008, endorsed by IATA Recommended Practice 1797A. Being one of the old timer in this list it is already established and adopted by more than 100 entities. It comprises almost 100 distinct fields that cover most aspects of flight, aircraft and handling details, inclusive of A-CDM. The AIDX working group is governed by ASC (Airport Services Committee) and PADIS (Passenger and Airport Data Interchange Standards) board under the custody of PSC (Passenger Service Conference).

Please note that AIDX will be migrated into the AIDM (Airline Industry Data Model) which has a much broader scope than AIDX. We shall not ignore AIDX as it will be around for a long time in its raw format and we can expect the AIDM implementation would be quite close (to be discussed and confirmed).

The current release is 16.1. Please follow below links for schema and implementation guide.

 

AIDM and BAG XML

The Airline Industry Data Model (AIDM) has a very broad scope and encompass industry terminology, data definitions, relationships, business requirements.
Looking at an evolution from paper (eg. loadsheets ticket), teletype messages to EDIFACT, the emerging new standards as models and XML are the latest step in the evolution and promise to deliver a better consistency of definitions and data formats, as well an improved interoperability and faster system integration times.
AIDM is work-in-progress and give its nature and vast landscape it might be the continuous model for it, though confirmed standards will arise from it. One of the first implementations adopting the AIDM is the BAG XML initiative which improves bag handling related bag messaging, distribution and does away with the traditional type B messages (BTM, BSM, BPM, BUM, BNS, BCM, BMM, BRQ as per IATA RP 1745).
The documents are not public at this stage, only registered member can access the model which is build with Sparx Enterprise Architect.

In part 2 I will review a simplified relational database model for an AODB as starting point for our migration journey. Stay tuned.

Some reference websites and material you find below.

References Organizations

Eurocontrol https://www.eurocontrol.int
ACI Airports Council International http://www.aci.aero
IATA International Air Transport Association http://www.iata.org
ICAO International Civil Aviation Organization http://www.icao.int
EUROCAE European Organisation for Civil Aviation Equipment https://www.eurocae.net
RTCA Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics http://www.rtca.org

References Standardization and models

ACRIS http://www.aci.aero/About-ACI/Priorities/Airport-IT/ACRIS
AIRM http://im.eurocontrol.int/wiki/index.php/ATM_Information_Reference_Model
https://www.eurocontrol.int/articles/airm-atm-information-reference-model
https://www.eurocontrol.int/sites/default/files/content/documents/sesar/8.1.3.d47-airm-primer-v4.1.0.pdf
AIDM http://www.iata.org/whatwedo/passenger/Pages/industry-data-model.aspx
AIDX http://www.iata.org/publications/Pages/info-data-exchange.aspx
BAG XML http://www.iata.org/whatwedo/ops-infra/baggage/Pages/baggage-xml.aspx
AIXM http://www.aixm.aero
https://ext.eurocontrol.int/aixmwiki_public/bin/view/Main/
WXXM http://www.wxxm.aero
FIXM https://www.fixm.aero
AMXM http://www.amxm.aero

( Model, implementation guidelines or schema available on website without registration.)

References Technology:

Disclaimer: This discussion, datamodel and application is for study purpose solely. It does not reflect or replicate any existing commercial product.