First Android 3.0 powered tablets showing up ! Galaxy Tab 2 ?

As expected, at the Mobile World Congress 2011 hardware manufacturers launched their soon to be available Android 3.0 powered tablets. Samsung presents the Galaxy Tab Sucessor, not “2” but Galaxy Tab 10.1. Certainly it will hit Singapore before end of April as the usual lock-in package of the local telcos.

I am still puzzled by a couple of things:

  • Size goes up (even weight remains small)
    While 7″ is just nice to carry and use, it fits in a side pocket, but is still bigger than the usual small size mobile phone and allows more or less serious usage. But 10.1″ is competing with a netbook, or you just try to be a little BIGGER than the iPad ? It does not fit in a side pocket.
  • No HDMI connector ?
    Why was it removed ? The device is capable too run FullHD movies and you lat me look at it in 1280×800 ? Whats the point ?
  • No (mini) SD Card slot ?
    Are you going the same way as Apple ? I cant extent the available memory and there is no way to just slot in a memory card to read files from a camera  or a notebook ? I must use the USB port or wireless ? You want to play FullHD and how do I copy a DVD content to the device ?
  • Dual camera ?
    What do you need that for ? Hold the tablet in front of you to make pictures ? How wired is that ? Can you run both at the same time ?
  • No standard USB port ?
    Of course slim is nice, but at a time when more companies try t follow standards you also come up with your new private connector ? More wire junk per device in my pocket !
  • Competitive price ?
    Sorry, around 1000.- SGD and beyond is not competitive.

I think it the presence of an upcoming Android 3.0 made Samsung jumped on the bandwagon and quickly push out a new device, just 6 months after the previous Galaxy Tab.

You can read the about the new tablet at engadget.com and the competition.

I see another problem for Android 3.0 and any devices, besides the split-up between 2.3/2.4 and 3.0, more apps will be available will soon that are hungry for CPU horsepower and resources leaving the regular mobile phone behind or even create unhappy app users know being aware of the lack of their devices power. A minimum hardware requirements like for PC games will soon be there, the app market will split up too.

Touchscreen Notebooks using Ubuntu

I purchased 2 notebooks with swivel-touch screens last weekend. Both coming with Windows 7 which I clonezilla’d, wiped out and installed Ubuntu immediately. Both are not an iPad killer whatsoever, but it suits my requirements: you can touch it, you can turn it (read books), it comes with a keyboard and I can load almost any application, even do some development work.

  • Asus EEE T101MT
    1.66 GHz Atom N450 CPU with hyperthreading
    10.1 inch screen, multi-touch resistive display with 1024 x 600 pixels resolution
    2 GB RAM and 320 GB HDD at 5400 RPM
    WiFi 802.11n
    4 cell 2400 mAh and 35 Wh battery pack, removable
    0.3 megapixel webcam
    3 USB ports,  VGA output, Ethernet, Kensington Lock, Mic and Headphones jack and SD Card reader 

    Installing Ubuntu: A breeze with 10.10 (Maverick). All info here.

  • Acer Aspire 1825PTZ
    Intel Pentium processor SU4100 (1.3 GHz, 800 MHz FSB)
    2GB Memory
    Graphics Controller: Intel GMA 4500MHD
    11.6″ Acer CineCrystal LED LCD With (capacitive) Multi Touch(1366×768)
    320GB HD
    0.3 megapixel webcam
    3 USB ports,  VGA output, HDMI Port,Ethernet, Kensington Lock, Mic and Headphones jack and SD/XD/MS Card reader 

    Installing Ubuntu: Basic Installation straight forward, but requires some hacking to get the touchscreen properly running and the auto-rotate screen. But you find all answers in this thread. And some more tricks here.