Daily Tech Observations

As the pandemic crisis continues, more discussion, data exchange and research is happening and progressing in the digital space. I wont mention the massive increase of security threads here (reference info at Trendmicro), but rather look at the non-malicious activities.

PEPP-PT

The PEPP-PT (Pan-European Privacy-Preserving Proximity Tracing) project around a number of prominent research institutes across Europe is working on a proximity-based solution utilising BLE technology embedded in mobile phones. It will be in line with GDPR regulations and to be used on a voluntary base. It is supposed to track and report your whereabouts adn nearby other app users to a server anonymously only, and inform you when you have been close to an infected person, all that without using personal information, which is the key concern of many parties. A key element for the success of such a solution is the penetration factor. It need to build up a database with a significant number of users and traces. Instead of releasing yet another app, they try to piggyback into existing apps, such as NINA (an app to publish and warn about local dangerous incidents in Germany). It has not been published yet, I assume the technical field test was successful is reported, still they have to sort out the communication channels in the case of an infected user.

COVID-19 Apps

There are no new apps in the Google Playstore since my last post, though I have to correct the app I mentioned previously, TraceTogether, only appears for Singapore based accounts. In the German Playstore we see two apps, the app “COVID-19” transmits the status of a COVID test to the respective user, only reducing the need to physically visit a place to retrieve the results. The other app, Coronika, tries to assist individuals to trace their locations and contacts.

Google to hand over anonymous location data

Google and the other big players are in active talks in various countries with the respective authorities about releasing data, either aggregated or anonymous or both. Depends very much on the local regulations. In the context of stopping the pandemy this would provide valuable insights. Aggregated data can help to identify streams of persons or hotspots of too many people in the same area or similar. If anonymization alone is good enough to protect personal data, I would question, the trace that everyone leaves with an Android phone (location services enabled) would easily allow to identify an individual or a small group, you just look at regularly visited places to identify someone’s home or office etc.

You know you can not only see your traces in Google Maps but also export the data (as well delete it permanently if you want) with the Take-Out feature?

Your Timeline – Google Maps
Take Out – Personal Google Maps Data

You are looking for some well formatted data to play with ? Download your own location data and have some hands-on datascience exercise. Easy to request and download, all nicely packaged in self-explaining JSON formatted monthly files.

Stay tuned and safe !